Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Tune into our Latest Podcasts for Employers



Have you tuned in to Hire a Hero, Hire a Vet, our series of podcasts dedicated to promoting the value that veterans bring to the workplace? Whether you currently hire veterans or just want to learn more about the impact that veterans have in the civilian workforce, this podcast is for you.

We've recently added new podcasts, including:




Visit us online to listen to these and many more episodes! And, if you have any questions about a specific show or recommendations for future topics, please send us an email at podcast@oriontalent.com. Happy listening!


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Employee Appreciation : Small gestures that will have a big impact on your employees

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Maya Angelou said it best: “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Check out our list below for a few ideas to help express your appreciation for your employees and help them feel valued at the workplace. You want to keep your best employees engaged and content, and the following ideas are a great start.
1. Recognize your team members as individuals - To boost team morale, it’s great to do something for your entire team—like catering lunch or donuts for breakfast. But if you’re aiming to show your appreciation for an individual, it can easily get lost in these types of group celebrations. Team birthdays and work anniversaries are good ways to make individual employees feel special on their big day. Host a team lunch, throw a small party, pass out cupcakes – there are many simple ways to let them know you care.
2. Be specific with praise - Leaders need to be specific in expressing their appreciation so that it reinforces behaviors through positive feedback for the employee.

3. Give impromptu time off - Spontaneous late arrival or early departure days are always a motivator. For example, send a quick email that says, “It’s a beautiful afternoon. Go enjoy it.” It doesn't have to be a routine or regular thing but it is most valued when it’s unexpected for those hard working employees.

4. Be transparent - Company leadership should keep their employees in the loop and let them know what is going on with the company. It generates a 'we're in this together' environment.

5. Feed your employees -  One way to an employee's heart is through their stomach. Putting sweet treats in the break room, or setting up a “Weclome to Work” station at the employee entrance with coffee, juice, donuts for the a.m. or catering a lunch on Employee Appreciation Day – it's an easy way to say 'thank you' for the work you do.

6. Company apparel - Who doesn’t love a free t-shirt or ball cap? Offering employees free company apparel and other logo merchandise can be a simple, inexpensive way to say, ‘thank you’.

7. Certificate of achievement - Present a certificate in honor of a specific achievement. Highlight your employees’ achievements by recognizing them in a company meeting, newsletter or email. Encourage peer-to-peer recognition, develop a program that lets employees give each other on-the-spot accolades on the community bulletin board or internal website. This allows employees to recognize their peers directly. Each month, the employees receiving awards could be entered into a drawing for a gift card or other award.

8. Jeans day - Give out coupons that allow employees to wear jeans on a day of their choosing, or designate an all-employee jeans day.

9. Work-from-home day - Remember significant events in your employees’ personal lives, such as a child starting kindergarten, and give them a work-from-home day so they can participate without worrying about coming into the office on time.

10. Special projects - Give your employees an opportunity to work on special projects beyond their regular responsibilities. Doing this will allow them to grow, and will also demonstrate your confidence in their abilities to do a good job.

11. Off-campus outing - Set up an off-site bowling, sporting, theatre or other event to recognize an entire department/work group (also great for team building).

12. Post team achievements in break rooms - Post team results in common areas, including the names of each member. It may be a chart or graph that shows positive improvement, or it may be a simple description of a project that highlights the benefits to the organization.

Remember, it is the little things that can go a long way toward making your employees feel wanted and needed at the workplace, which will ultimately improve their productivity and engagement.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Why You Should Be Hiring Veterans in the Aerospace & Defense Industry


According to Military.com, the Aerospace and Defense industry is  “huge and complex,” serving both military and commercial markets. From companies looking to send humans to Mars to those building military aircraft, the opportunities to employ veterans and leverage their state-of-the-art training abound.

There are two main issues currently facing this industry for which hiring veterans are an excellent solution. The United States Department of Labor, Employment Training Administration points to the impending retirement of many mature workers, who possess experience and intellectual capital and a loss of technical talent. To combat these impediments, the DOL suggests employers protect the skills base by relying on youthful and diverse workers, found in non-traditional labor pools.

Military candidates can perform a wide range of functions in this industry. Here are a few examples of positions  in which we’ve seen veterans excel.

Project or Program Managers
Veterans have experience juggling the demands of complex programs and projects. Throughout their military career, they have balanced human capital, critical resources, and time constraints to meet organizational goals. Their leadership skills allow them to form and motivate diverse teams to insure the project is done on time and above standard. Veterans have an easy transition from the military to programs supporting the military. They are subject matter experts and proven transformational leaders.

Engineering
Military candidates are well trained and schooled in the technical aspects necessary to succeed as a sales, product, or developmental engineer. Veterans come with advanced degrees and the hands-on experience necessary to contribute to the bottom line. Today's military professionals receive practical application and schooling in six sigma and lean manufacturing principles, and have a solid foundation of engineering skills. This background, combined with leadership skills and unlimited potential, gives a company great flexibility in using our Engineers in a variety of capacities.

New Business Development Manager
Understanding the structure of the Department of Defense allows veterans to use their contacts and networks in order to find key personnel and opportunities necessary to generate new business. That ability, combined with their determination and knowledge, ensures success in securing those necessary contracts. Most military candidates are adept in, and fully understand, the RFP and Bid Process.

Field Service or Maintenance Technician
Military technicians represent some of the best electrical, mechanical, and electronic talent anywhere. Technically trained with real world experience, veterans frequently work on the same equipment they worked on in the military. With a greatly reduced learning curve and solid fundamentals, our technicians are able to work on the most complex equipment. Furthermore, their excellent communication skills, professional presentation, and maturity guarantee success onsite at a client's location.

As you can see, veterans are the answer to an aging workforce short on the technical talent it needs to innovate. In our nearly 30 years, Orion Talent has helped more than 200 aerospace companies hire veterans. We invite employers to connect with us and learn more about how we can help fill your team with fresh, highly skilled talent you need.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary 78th Birthday


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Last week the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary celebrated 78 years of continuous volunteer service on America’s waterways.

On June 23, 1939, the Coast Guard “Reserve” was born from an act of Congress authorizing civilians to work for the Coast Guard promoting boating safety, both on the high seas and inland waters. On February 19, 1941, it was re-designated the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary.

Coast Guard Auxiliarists today provide an invaluable service to team Coast Guard in a wide variety of missions. The primary mission is recreational boating safety as exemplified by Auxiliarists around the country utilizing their personally owned, authorized facilities to conduct safety patrols.

Auxiliarists can be found examining commercial fishing vessels, flying in C-130 aircraft, working in Coast Guard offices, and crewing with regulars. The three components of the service–the active duty Coast Guardsmen, the Reservists, and Auxiliarists truly help make the full Coast Guard team.

Here are just a few of the many volunteer activities that Coast Guard Auxiliarists perform:  

  • Perform free Vessel Safety Checks, which help boaters ensure their craft complies with Federal boating regulations.
  • Teach boating safety to recreational boaters of all ages.
  • Operate safety and regatta patrols, and serve as an integral part of the Coast Guard Search and Rescue team.
  • Stand communication watches, assist during mobilization exercises, perform harbor and pollution patrols, provide platforms for unarmed boarding parties.
  • Recruit and provide initial training for people wanting to join the Active Duty or Reserve Coast Guard.
  • Assist in other Coast Guard functions, duties, roles, missions or operations as authorized by law.
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The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary members exemplify core values of Honor, Respect, and Devotion to Duty. Thank you, Coast Guard Auxiliary, for being Semper Paratus!



Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Talent Solutions Survey Results Now Available - Making the Grade: Where Talent Solution Providers Succeed (and Fail)


On June 7, Orion Talent released the results of its survey, Making the Grade: Where Talent Solution Providers Succeed (and Fail). The goal of the survey was to better understand what makes talent supplier relationships tick, whether it be speed of response, access to real-time metrics, or overall business alignment. Utilizing data from an online survey of 119 talent solution clients, the survey yielded some interesting results.

Perhaps most revealing was that more than two thirds of companies reported their business goals are aligned with talent solution providers at the start of engagements, but that alignment plummets to a D grade over time. On average, companies rate the alignment between their current talent programs and strategic business objectives a 69 out of 100. When asked how this misalignment could be improved, clients reveal their top three answers: metrics to show business impact and success, better communication with executive leadership, and recurring meetings with company leaders throughout the engagement.

“There is incredible opportunity for providers to elevate themselves as strategic business partners,” said Orion Talent CEO, Mike Starich. “Our survey reveals the client-provider relationship declines significantly as the engagement progresses. It starts off great, with more than two thirds of companies saying alignment is good or excellent. But over time, lack of communication and metrics that work for both sides deteriorate the partnership. Providers and clients must both revisit program goals and SLAs to manage program changes, and better communication between providers, HR, and executive leadership is essential.”

Our survey also revealed the following:

Top-ranked characteristics of A and B providers
Delivering quality of candidates (35 percent)
Meeting volume/scale of recruiting needs (21 percent)
Effective communication (18 percent)

Reasons providers fail
Companies say 35 percent of providers fail
Failure to reduce cost is the #1 reason for failure
Metrics holds the #2 spot, tied with failure to recruit passive candidates

But there is hope! More clients try to fix things with the provider than cut ties with them (47 percent vs. 40 percent). But these providers have a short window to prove their ROI—37 percent give their provider 1-3 months and 34 percent allow 4-6 months to prove success.

These are just few of the many meaningful insights from our survey. Click here to download our survey report.

Want to learn more about what this data means for you and how you can get actionable advice? Click here to watch “Why Staffing and Recruiting Relationships Fail – and How You Can Avoid It”, an HR.com webinar presented by Cory Kruse, President, Orion Novotus; and Malaika Kattke, Senior Human Resources Manager, Americas Region for QAD Inc.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

NEW WEBINAR - Why Staffing and Recruiting Relationships Fail – and How You Can Avoid It




In a recent survey on talent provider relationships, Orion Talent uncovered a surprising number of damaged and failed relationships. In conjunction with this survey, Orion presented a webinar on June 7 called “Why Staffing and Recruiting Relationships Fail – and How You Can Avoid It”. Along with Malaika Kattke, Senior Human Resources Manager, Americas Region for QAD Inc., Orion Novotus President Cory Kruse presents common factors that cause vendor relationships to succeed or fail, supported by recent survey data.

Low expectations abound, with scant few end clients giving their providers top grades.  From contingent staffing and MSP to perm placement and RPO, the story is the same:  few providers have risen to the level of strategic business partner.  This webinar offers two unique perspectives on building stronger relationships, from overcoming common roadblocks to incorporating performance metrics into strategic planning.

You'll find concrete steps HR Leaders and Professionals, Procurement Managers, and Hiring Managers can take to ensure they’re just as engaged and enthusiastic about their talent partnerships six months in as when they signed the contract.  Click
here to view the webinar and begin building better talent provider relationships today!

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Why Staffing and Recruiting Relationships Fail – and How You Can Avoid It

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Do your talent solution providers meet your expectations 100% of the time? If not, you’re not alone. In a recent survey on talent provider relationships, Orion Talent uncovered a surprising number of damaged and failed relationships.

Low expectations abound, with scant few end clients giving their providers top grades. From contingent staffing and MSP to perm placement and RPO, the story is the same:  few providers have risen to the level of strategic business partner.  Is this the new norm, or should you expect more from your talent partners?   
 
Join this interactive session to explore the factors that cause vendor relationships to succeed or fail, supported by survey data and real-life scenarios.  Some might surprise you, but we’ll also hit upon the usual suspects.

You don't want to miss today’s webinar at 11 am ET on Why Staffing and Recruiting Relationships Fail – and How You Can Avoid It.

In conjunction with Malaika Kattke, Senior Human Resources Manager, Americas Region for QAD Inc., Orion Novotus President Cory Kruse will present common factors that cause vendor relationships to succeed or fail, supported by recent survey data.


You'll get two unique perspectives on building stronger relationships, from overcoming common roadblocks to incorporating performance metrics into strategic planning.